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SOUTH ASIA CONFLICT MONITOR

CBRN Digest

Monthly newsletter on Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear Weapons, Materials, Proliferation, Environmental and Humanitarian issues.



Research Papers

In absence of a national security strategy (NSS), the task of intelligence agencies in India has failed to be systemic. India’s intelligence infrastructure lacks a holistic view and very less effort has been put to reorganize intelligence infrastructure on the basis of contemporary threat perceptions. Without a strong security infrastructure country cannot eye towards becoming a regional power. Due to a rigid security system, India has a disparate intelligence mechanism in service. While little effort has gone towards synergizing all sources of intelligence and request dissemination in real time/ near real time basis. This paper attempts to outline a number of points, which would help to develop a more superior external intelligence infrastructure.

  • Defence budget cannot be stretched beyond a point, which means Defence Minister Manohar Parrikar has a tough choice for resources deployment.
  • Reducing revenue expenses and more spending for capital purchases pose the biggest challenge for Indian MoD
  • National defence budget is all about ‘revenue’ side of armed forces and their ‘capital’ requirements. But, is India spending adequately on defence R&D?
  • National Defence Budget must be reasonably used to get maximum value for the state and its preparedness.

The threat of chemical and biological terrorism emanating from non-state actors, including the Islamic Jihadi organisations, which control large swathes of territories and resources, remains a major concern for nation states today. Over the years, the capability and intentions of Islamic jihadist groups have changed. They evidently prefer for more destructive and spectacular methods. This can be very well argued that if these weapons systems, materials or technologies were made available to them, they probably would use it against their enemy to maximize the impact and fear factor.

Once the negotiations for FMCT start, a window of opportunity would open up for the Conference on Disarmament to develop a legally binding mechanism to eliminate fissile material and nuclear weapons from the face of the earth, attaining the objective of universal and comprehensive disarmament.

The quinquennial review conference of the NPT is to be held from April 27 to May 22, 2015. After the failure of the last NPT RevCon held in 2010 hope has once again re-surfaced amongst the international community, including India for a strengthened nuclear non-proliferation regime. The initial success of the three Preparatory Committee (PrepCom) meetings held in 2012, 2013 and 2014 is believed to have laid the foundation for successful NPT deliberations that is expected to reduce the salience on nuclear weapons and steer the world towards nuclear disarmament.

The dual use research in life sciences has raised serious concerns for bio-safety and bio-security today as there exists possibilities of misuse of knowledge, information, products and technologies to promote bio-terrorism or bio-warfare activities. Misuse may pose consequential threat to public health and safety, agricultural crops and other plants, animals, the environment, material or national security. India has strict and robust regulations on bio-safety and bio-security policies that provide adequate safeguards for responsible conduct and oversight of life sciences research. However, safety measures are far from satisfactory and the implementation agencies are weak. There is an acute shortage of technically-trained manpower and machinery to strictly enforce the regulatory system.

NLWs: Steps India Should Consider:

  • A collective strategic vision, organizational coordination, synergy, and able political leadership will be vital for India’s futuristic NLWs deployment.
  • R&D is vital in order to develop technology that is in national interest.
  • Standardization and documentation of equipment validity is eminent to make sure they are safe.
  • Recording and documentation of events are important so that nature of the event and effect can be analyzed and used for research.
  • The legal framework needs to be developed to determine whether a new system is lawful and to ensure the legality of the use of NLWs at the time of deployment.
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